programs
programs

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  • This Harvard Law School project assists women by helping them seek restraining orders against their abusers in district courts and by referring them to the appropriate shelters, counseling services, and government agencies. Members also staff a battered women’s hotline and referral service. Co-sponsored by the Children and Family Rights Project and the Women’s Law Association.


  • Phillips Brooks House Association
    Harvard College

    Harvard's Best Buddies chapter is part of the international organization that matches individuals with intellectual disabilities in one-to-one friendships with their non-disabled peers. Students who become Peer Buddies are expected to contact their Buddy weekly and participate in two activities per month. In the past, individuals with intellectual disabilities have not had the opportunity to have friends outside of their own environment, and we are similarly limited at Harvard.

    contact:
    Amanda Sonis Glynn
    Travis Lovett

  • Phillips Brooks House Association
    Public Service Network

    The Beta Buddies mentoring program is the community service part of the College Diabetes Network, a student organization that works for and with type I diabetic college students and students interested in type-I diabetes. The program pairs college undergrads who have type-I diabetes with children and teens with type-I diabetes for an informal mentoring relationship. Beta Buddies creates an opportunity to build a friendship that may include discussion of type-I diabetes (but doesn’t have to) as well as more traditional mentoring responsibilities and general fun times.

    contact:
    Amanda Sonis Glynn

  • Harvard College

    Harvard undergraduates created Bhumi (Sanskrit for "Earth") in 1996 to raise awareness about major issues such as public health, natural resource management, human rights, education, and environmental activism. Also known as the Harvard International Development Group, Bhumi works to serve developing communities around the world through education and direct action and by engaging students in new and innovative ways to help these global problems.

    contact:
    Meg Brooks Swift

  • Harvard Law School

    This organizations matches 40 student volunteers at Harvard Law School with needy children, ages seven to fourteen, in the Cambridge and Somerville area.


  • The Black Law Students Association (BLSA) is an academic, political and social group at Harvard Law School which has strong ties with the local black community. BLSA sponsors street law clinics each year to hundreds of area youth and BLSA members serve as tutors and mentors to area high school and elementary students.


  • The Harvard School of Public Health together with community leaders and Harvard faculty work to identify and address the environmental health concerns of the Roxbury, South End, and Jamaica Plain neighborhoods with special focus being placed on childhood asthma and lead poisoning.


  • Harvard College

    Harvard runs quite a few community-based programs, and the University’s students are not alone in their ambition and desire to help others. BASIC, or Boston Area Students in the Community, works with other service-minded students at Boston colleges to create and run service initiatives throughout the area, including tutoring and after school programs for children, neighborhood clean-up efforts, and other daylong projects.

    contact:
    Meg Brooks Swift

  • Harvard Business School

    The Boston Digital Bridge Foundation provides technology training and computer equipment to underserved Boston families, a move that can have a real impact on students and parents alike, propelling them forward in school and the workplace. The Harvard Business partners with the Foundation to provide monetary support for two of its special events: Evening on the Bridge, which celebrates program participants, and Hub on Wheels, a citywide bike festival that raises money for the Foundation.

    contact:
    John Korn

  • Harvard College

    This partnership between the Boston Police Youth Service Officers and area colleges connects young people from all of Boston’s neighborhoods with student-athletes from participating schools: Harvard University, Boston University, Boston College, UMASS Boston and Northeastern University.


  • Athletics

    Once a year, Harvard hosts the Youth Service Officer from the Boston Police Department and the youngsters with whom the officer works. Together, Harvard coaches and athletes organize and run mini-sports clinics for the Boston youths, but it’s also an opportunity for these young visitors to tour the Harvard campus and attend a Crimson football game. While this special day brings local kids onto campus to have fun and build their self-confidence through sports, it also aims to makes the idea of college seem more accessible.


  • Graduate School of Education

    Strong schools need strong leaders. This program brings educators from seven Boston schools to the Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE) several times a year for a chance to network and attend professional development sessions. This program evolved from the former Boston-Harvard Leadership Development Initiative, a larger collaboration of HGSE and the Boston Public Schools (BPS) initially funded by FleetBoston Financial.

    contact:
    Roger Dempsey

  • Phillips Brooks House Association
    Harvard College

    PBHA’s Boston Refugee Youth Enrichment is dedicated to helping Southeast Asian refugee children adapt and flourish in an environment which offers them few resources. Our children, ages 6-16, live in Dorchester, where there is a large Vietnamese immigrant population. BRYE strives to meet the needs of the community through tutoring and mentoring programs. BOSTON REFUGEE YOUTH ENRICHMENT 1-2-1

    contact:
    Kerry McGowan

  • Harvard Business School

    As further evidence of the Harvard Business School’s (HBS) investment in education, HBS students volunteer as tutors at the Thomas Gardner Elementary School in Boston. And since education is also about technology these days, the Business School also donates funds to purchase interactive learning tools that support these tutoring programs.

    contact:
    John Korn

  • Harvard School of Public Health

    Longer, better, healthier lives. That’s the goal of Boston Steps, which is working to reduce the burden of diabetes, obesity, asthma, and related health factors in the Boston community. The Harvard Prevention Research Center (HPRC), part of the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH), is working with the Boston Public Health Commission to provide evaluation for Boston Steps.

    contact:
    Angie Cradock

  • Harvard Business School

    The business world and the arts do indeed mix. Because the Boston Symphony Orchestra (BSO) can cover only 60 percent of its operating costs with ticket sales and earned income, it relies on contributions for support. The Harvard Business School is among its local supporters, making regular memorial contributions to this renowned cultural institution.

    contact:
    Deborah Bayles

  • Harvard Business School

    The Boys & Girls Clubs are popular after school destinations for youngsters, and the experience is made richer by the volunteers. Harvard Business School staff members from MBA Program visit their local center on a weekly basis to help with homework, run activities, and even serve snacks, all the while having fun with the kids.

    contact:
    John Korn

  • Harvard School of Public Health

    Breaking It Down (BID), is a pilot project to address issues related to community literacy and cancer clinical trials. This project enhances access and increases participation in cancer clinical trials among Roxbury residents by changing knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and intention among health care providers, community leaders and members. BID involves peer trainers to provide education and targeted social marketing regarding clinical trials to reduce fear and mistrust of research.

    contact:
    Naomi Bitow

  • Harvard Kennedy School

    The Broadmoor Project is a multi-year collaboration with residents of the neighborhood of Broadmoor in New Orleans, LA, to help bring their community back after the devastation of hurricane Katrina in 2005. Eighty Harvard University graduate students – most of them from Harvard Kennedy School – have spent either spring, winter, or summer break in New Orleans consulting and collecting data on repopulation, education, housing, and economic development.

    contact:
    Carolyn Wood

  • Phillips Brooks House Association
    Harvard College

    PBHA’s BRYE 1-2-1 is a big sibling program for children who already have a working knowledge of English and would benefit from a one-on-one mentoring relationship. Through this program, we seek to help them experience parts of American culture they might otherwise miss, give them role models to look up to, and make friendships that endure.

    contact:
    Kerry McGowan

  • Phillips Brooks House Association
    Harvard College

    PBHA’s BRYE Extension teaches an academic enrichment curriculum to Vietnamese and Cape Veridian refugee children after school in a small classroom setting. There are three class levels, with the youngest class ranging in age from 6 to 8, a middle class 8-10, and a class for more advanced students generally ranging from ages 10-12. All classes focus on improving English and reading skills with the older two classes also incorporating quantitative enrichment through interactive experiments and activities.

    contact:
    Kerry McGowan

  • Phillips Brooks House Association
    Harvard College

    On Saturday afternoons, Harvard undergrads travel to Dorchester to work with teenagers who are immigrants to the United States as part of BRYE Teen (part of the Boston Refugee Youth Enrichment Program).

    contact:
    Kerry McGowan

  • Phillips Brooks House Association
    Harvard College

    PBHA’s BRYE Tutoring program, founded in 1987, strives to give children of immigrants from various countries (such as Vietnam, Dominican Republic, Haiti, and Cape Verde) a foothold in America through instruction in the English language. By fostering a close, mentoring relationship between tutor and tutee, BRYE Tutoring is dedicated to bridging the cultural barrier not only through knowledge of language, but also by inspiring confidence and increasing self-esteem through a solid friendship.

    contact:
    Kerry McGowan

  • The Building Bridges program is coordinated by the Harvard Law School Program on Negotiation and helps students to understand the principles behind and the value of negotiation. The curriculum has been used at both inner-city and suburban high schools to teach students skills in relating to friends, parents, teachers and employers.


  • Phillips Brooks House Association
    Harvard College

    PBHA’s Cambridge After School Program strives for social justice in the Cambridge community. CASP focuses on providing affordable and accessible after school programming for low-income Cambridge youth. By following this mission, CASP hopes to combat socio economic disparity and empower Cambridge youth, allowing them to realize their full potential. Through the unique tutoring/workshop structure of the program, CASP not only provides academic assistance, but also engages youth to explore interests in the fields of art, technology, athletics and more.

    contact:
    Robert Bridgeman

  • Harvard College
    Athletics

    The Cambridge Jets, a private track club, are avid runners whose young members range in age from 7 to 14. Since 1997, the Harvard Women’s Track Team has maintained a relationship with the girls on the Cambridge Jets, hosting an activity for these young runners at least every month. Brought together by their love of running, the Harvard women and their younger counterparts meet over lunches, go bowling, visit the Children’s Museum and, of course, cheer each other on at track meets.


  • Public Service Network

    Cambridge Microfinance Initiative is the first student group at Harvard solely dedicated toward helping local aspiring small-business owners achieve their goals. We provide public service in helping clients secure microfinance loans through our partnership with Accion USA. Our clients receive one-on-one consultation and personalized business advice from our student volunteers.

    contact:
    Amanda Sonis Glynn
    Travis Lovett

  • Phillips Brooks House Association

    PBHA’s Cambridge 1-2-1's mission is to connect Harvard undergraduates to high school students at the Community Charter School of Cambridge (CCSC) through one-on-one mentoring. Each mentor-mentee pair meets on a schedule that they determine, and attends our monthly program-wide outings to restaurants, colleges, etc. Mentors with 1-2-1 serve as big brothers/sisters as well as personal and academic advisers for their mentees and are widely perceived as hugely valuable influences by both students and faculty at CCSC

    contact:
    Robert Bridgeman

  • Office of Government, Community and Public Affairs

    Cambridge Partnership for Public Education is a collaborative effort of higher education, business and industry, community leaders, teachers and parents working to improve Cambridge Public Schools. Working with the Cambridge School Department, the Partnership sets priorities for improving professional development for teachers and administrators, curriculum development, early childhood education, youth employment, and post-secondary opportunities.


  • Graduate School of Education

    This series of CPS seminars with HGSE faculty and other associates focuses on effective and informed practices, national trends in educational leadership, and the power of language in leadership. Sessions are planned for Cambridge Public School Program Directors, Principals, Assistant Principals, Deans of Curriculum, Deans of Students and Curriculum Coordinators, and CRLS Curriculum Coordinators and Instructional Coaches.

    contact:
    Roger Dempsey

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