programs
programs

%1 %2 Harvard College programs

Harvard College

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Staff Photo by Jon Chase/Harvard University News Office
  • Phillips Brooks House Association
    Harvard College
    Public Service Network

    A Stitch in Time uses knitting to help fulfill community needs of warm clothing and caring outreach through three unique branches. The Outbound Branch aims to empower women in local shelters by teaching them how to knit. The Inbound program strives to teach and foster knitting among undergraduates on campus so that items knitted can be donated. The Inbound-Outbound Connection serves as an intermediary between these two programs.

    contact:
    Amanda Sonis Glynn

  • Phillips Brooks House Association
    Harvard College
    Public Service Network

    The purpose of this chapter is to motivate college students nationwide to become actively involved in immigration reform. It focuses in part on providing immigrant students equal educational opportunities by means of lobbying, educating the public, and raising awareness within campus communities and throughout the nation. It is our hope that the Act on a Dream club will grant thousands of hardworking students access to higher education and eventual citizenship while promoting political activism among the nation’s youth.

    contact:
    Amanda Sonis Glynn

  • Harvard College
    Public Service Network

    Adelante! aims to foster personal development of high school freshmen girls, motivating them to set high goals and helping them to build the academic skills and virtues of character that they will need to excel in their academic, social, and professional lives. Working with students from North Cambridge Catholic High School, participants of Adelante! form friendships with the girls through one-on-one tutoring. Academic growth extends beyond homework help through skill-building projects in reading, writing, and math.

    contact:
    Amanda Sonis Glynn
    Travis Lovett

  • Phillips Brooks House Association
    Harvard College

    PBHA’s AHEAD is a tutoring program working to teach and build relationships with the youth of R.W. Emerson School in Roxbury. Our aim is to help disadvantaged children use their academic and personal strengths to succeed academically and personally. There are two parts to the afterschool program: homework tutorial and AHEAD-coordinated educational games and lessons. AHEAD serves 20 Cape Verdean, African-American, and Latino students ages 5-12 (kindergarten-5th grade).

    contact:
    David Dance

  • Harvard College
    Public Service Network

    Named for the first Black woman to graduate from Radcliffe College, the Alberta V. Scott (AVS) Leadership Academy gives participating 9th, 10th and 11th grade girls the opportunity to cultivate leadership skills and individual creativity through semester-long projects. Each girl, or scholar, is assigned a mentor, and mentors and scholars participate in weekly discussions on topics ranging from maintaining physical and emotional health to setting and achieving goals.

    contact:
    Amanda Sonis Glynn

  • Phillips Brooks House Association
    Harvard College

    PBHA’s Alternative Spring Breaks runs public service trips during Spring Break. We travel to rural and urban areas throughout the eastern United States. We work closely with community organizations to (1) renovate homes, churches, community centers, and playgrounds; and (2) learn about the social, economic, and political issues affecting the region. There is time for fun activities like bowling, skating, and visiting national parks. With a motto of “Community service, cultural exchange, and fun,” ASB provides a worthwhile experience during Spring Break.

    contact:
    Kate Meunier

  • Harvard College

    ARTS FIRST is Harvard’s annual four-day festival, sponsored by the Harvard Board of Overseers, that celebrates those students and faculty who are involved in the arts. The entire community is encouraged to check out Harvard’s art scene and its more than 200 events—most of them free and open to the public—that include a dance festival, theatrical performances, exhibitions, films, concerts, musicals, and poetry readings. Information: Office of the Arts 617-495-8699


  • Phillips Brooks House Association
    Harvard College

    Harvard's Best Buddies chapter is part of the international organization that matches individuals with intellectual disabilities in one-to-one friendships with their non-disabled peers. Students who become Peer Buddies are expected to contact their Buddy weekly and participate in two activities per month. In the past, individuals with intellectual disabilities have not had the opportunity to have friends outside of their own environment, and we are similarly limited at Harvard.

    contact:
    Amanda Sonis Glynn
    Travis Lovett

  • Harvard College

    Harvard undergraduates created Bhumi (Sanskrit for "Earth") in 1996 to raise awareness about major issues such as public health, natural resource management, human rights, education, and environmental activism. Also known as the Harvard International Development Group, Bhumi works to serve developing communities around the world through education and direct action and by engaging students in new and innovative ways to help these global problems.

    contact:
    Meg Brooks Swift

  • Harvard College

    Harvard runs quite a few community-based programs, and the University’s students are not alone in their ambition and desire to help others. BASIC, or Boston Area Students in the Community, works with other service-minded students at Boston colleges to create and run service initiatives throughout the area, including tutoring and after school programs for children, neighborhood clean-up efforts, and other daylong projects.

    contact:
    Meg Brooks Swift

  • Harvard College

    This partnership between the Boston Police Youth Service Officers and area colleges connects young people from all of Boston’s neighborhoods with student-athletes from participating schools: Harvard University, Boston University, Boston College, UMASS Boston and Northeastern University.


  • Phillips Brooks House Association
    Harvard College

    PBHA’s Boston Refugee Youth Enrichment is dedicated to helping Southeast Asian refugee children adapt and flourish in an environment which offers them few resources. Our children, ages 6-16, live in Dorchester, where there is a large Vietnamese immigrant population. BRYE strives to meet the needs of the community through tutoring and mentoring programs. BOSTON REFUGEE YOUTH ENRICHMENT 1-2-1

    contact:
    Kerry McGowan

  • Phillips Brooks House Association
    Harvard College

    PBHA’s BRYE 1-2-1 is a big sibling program for children who already have a working knowledge of English and would benefit from a one-on-one mentoring relationship. Through this program, we seek to help them experience parts of American culture they might otherwise miss, give them role models to look up to, and make friendships that endure.

    contact:
    Kerry McGowan

  • Phillips Brooks House Association
    Harvard College

    PBHA’s BRYE Extension teaches an academic enrichment curriculum to Vietnamese and Cape Veridian refugee children after school in a small classroom setting. There are three class levels, with the youngest class ranging in age from 6 to 8, a middle class 8-10, and a class for more advanced students generally ranging from ages 10-12. All classes focus on improving English and reading skills with the older two classes also incorporating quantitative enrichment through interactive experiments and activities.

    contact:
    Kerry McGowan

  • Phillips Brooks House Association
    Harvard College

    On Saturday afternoons, Harvard undergrads travel to Dorchester to work with teenagers who are immigrants to the United States as part of BRYE Teen (part of the Boston Refugee Youth Enrichment Program).

    contact:
    Kerry McGowan

  • Phillips Brooks House Association
    Harvard College

    PBHA’s BRYE Tutoring program, founded in 1987, strives to give children of immigrants from various countries (such as Vietnam, Dominican Republic, Haiti, and Cape Verde) a foothold in America through instruction in the English language. By fostering a close, mentoring relationship between tutor and tutee, BRYE Tutoring is dedicated to bridging the cultural barrier not only through knowledge of language, but also by inspiring confidence and increasing self-esteem through a solid friendship.

    contact:
    Kerry McGowan

  • Phillips Brooks House Association
    Harvard College

    PBHA’s Cambridge After School Program strives for social justice in the Cambridge community. CASP focuses on providing affordable and accessible after school programming for low-income Cambridge youth. By following this mission, CASP hopes to combat socio economic disparity and empower Cambridge youth, allowing them to realize their full potential. Through the unique tutoring/workshop structure of the program, CASP not only provides academic assistance, but also engages youth to explore interests in the fields of art, technology, athletics and more.

    contact:
    Robert Bridgeman

  • Harvard College
    Athletics

    The Cambridge Jets, a private track club, are avid runners whose young members range in age from 7 to 14. Since 1997, the Harvard Women’s Track Team has maintained a relationship with the girls on the Cambridge Jets, hosting an activity for these young runners at least every month. Brought together by their love of running, the Harvard women and their younger counterparts meet over lunches, go bowling, visit the Children’s Museum and, of course, cheer each other on at track meets.


  • Harvard College

    Cambridge Student Partnerships (CSP) is a student-run nonprofit organization that seeks to reduce the barriers to finding employment, housing, and various community resources for local low-income residents. With energy, enthusiasm, and open minds, our volunteers leverage their understanding of the local business sector and knowledge of available community resources to provide personalized, pro bono advisory services to each client.

    contact:
    Amanda Sonis Glynn

  • Harvard College

    The only building in North America designed by internationally known architect Le Corbusier, the Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts is a draw for film and art lovers alike. It serves as a center for the exhibition of classic film presentations as well as exciting new works by students and visual artists. Presentations and lectures are scheduled throughout the year, and screenings of classic, rare, historic, and popular films occur nearly every night of the year at the Harvard Film Archive for a modest charge.


  • Harvard College

    Teens are encouraged to develop relationships with both the counselors and their fellow teens through a two hour program on Tuesdays and Thursdays, as well as various field trips throughout the semester. Regular program consists of a mixture of homework time and a fun and skill building project designed to foster maturity, creativity, leadership, teamwork, and responsibility.

    contact:
    Kerry McGowan

  • Harvard College

    CityServe is a Harvard student organization which provides tutors to Tenacity, Inc. Tenacity, Inc. is a nonprofit organization which delivers free literacy training, homework help, and tennis instruction to Boston-area middle school children. The tennis program utilizes a fun, games-based approach designed to keep the kids moving and build a love for the sport that hopefully can last a lifetime.

    contact:
    Amanda Sonis Glynn
    Travis Lovett

  • Harvard College
    Public Service Network

    CityStep is a unique organization run entirely by undergraduates that introduces public school youth to the performing arts as an outlet for creative self-expression, a tool for building self-esteem, and a means to mutual understanding. The program is one of the largest student organizations on Harvard’s campus: approximately 75 undergraduates work together to serve over 100 Cambridge public school children annually.

    contact:
    Amanda Sonis Glynn

  • Harvard College
    Public Service Network

    College Matters (CM) is a student-run nonprofit that helps disadvantaged high school students apply to college. Having published a book on the application process in 2004, CM has provided high school students with valuable advice and support through seminar presentations both locally and across the country. In addition, CM runs a national scholarship competition that annually receives 15,000 applications from graduating high school seniors.

    contact:
    Amanda Sonis Glynn
    Travis Lovett

  • Harvard College
    Public Service Network

    As the Harvard Crimson’s community service program, Crimson in the Community combines journalism with public service. Volunteers work with local high school students from around Boston at schools with new or under-funded journalism programs. Activities include brainstorming stories, editing pieces, and talking with students about basic rules of design and writing. The program also extends into the summer, when the Crimson invites a small group of high school students from around Boston to participate in a week-long journalism workshop.

    contact:
    Amanda Sonis Glynn

  • Harvard College
    Faculty of Arts and Sciences
    Public Service Network

    The purpose of Cultural Agents at Harvard College is to activate art as a social resource by cultivating actions and thought within the undergraduate student body that aim to make measurable contributions to the education and development of local, national, and international communities.

    contact:
    Amanda Sonis Glynn

  • Harvard College

    The David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies opens up multiple avenues for the community to explore Latin American studies and culture. The Center sponsors a wide variety of speakers and events, including the Latin American/Latino Speakers Bureau, professional development seminars for K-12 teachers, field trips to the Center and Harvard museums, volunteer placement for students in local organizations in Spanish, Portuguese, and Haitian Creole-speaking communities, and a variety of public cultural events.

    contact:
    Jill Netchinsky Toussaint

  • Harvard College

    FUP is a student-run program that introduces incoming Harvard College first-year students to the Cambridge-Boston area and to the service and activist community in and around Harvard. FUP participants spend the week preceding Freshman Orientation working on projects for nonprofit community organizations. Accompanied by two or three upper-classmen leaders, FUPpies work in teams of six or eight at a project site in the Greater Boston area.

    contact:
    Amanda Sonis Glynn

  • Harvard College
    Public Service Network

    FIMRC-Harvard is dedicated to improve the lives of children around the world primarily through health education and medical supply distribution. Each year, groups of volunteers travel during intercession, spring break, and the summer to international clinic sites to help in the local effort of disseminating invaluable information to village residents. On campus, FIMRC members seek to broaden awareness on international health concerns and fundraise to provide medical supplies.

    contact:
    Amanda Sonis Glynn
    Travis Lovett

  • Harvard College

    Getting more youths to attend—and more importantly, succeed in—college takes a lot of preparation, years even. GEAR UP (Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs) starts early, reaching out to seventh-graders and providing the tools and resources they need to succeed, first in high school and later in college.

    contact:
    Matt Farley